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Habilidades esenciales del Community Manager #infografia #infographic #socialmedia

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Una infografía sobre Habilidades esenciales del Community Manager. Vía


Un saludo


Habilidades esenciales del Community Manager

Habilidades esenciales del Community Manager





Archivado en: Infografía, Redes Sociales, Sociedad de la información Tagged: Community Manager, Infografía, internet, redes sociales, tic, Web 2.0.



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Cómo potenciar Linkedin para la búsqueda de #empleo #infografia #infographic #socialmedia

Hola:


Una infografía sobre Cómo potenciar Linkedin para la búsqueda de #empleo.


Un saludo


Cómo potenciar Linkedin para la búsqueda de #empleo

Cómo potenciar Linkedin para la búsqueda de #empleo





Archivado en: Infografía, Inserción laboral, Redes Sociales, Sociedad de la información Tagged: Infografía, Inserción laboral, internet, Linkedin, redes sociales, tic, Web 2.0.



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Seattle City Council Approves $15/Hour Minimum Wage For Some Workers

The Seattle City Council discusses the minimum wage hike on Monday (Photo: @evanbush)

The Seattle City Council discusses the minimum wage hike on Monday (Photo: @evanbush)



While federal lawmakers mull over the President’s call for a $10/hour minimum wage, the Seattle City Council has approved a phased-in wage increase that will lift the city’s minimum hourly pay to $15 an hour, the highest rate in the entire country.

The proposed pay hike was given the green light last week by a Council committee on wages, and went before the full City Council for a vote on Monday afternoon.


Washington state already has a relatively high minimum wage at $9.32/hour, more than two dollars above the $7.25/hour federal minimum. The ordinance adopted by Seattle would require all businesses in the city to increase their pay levels up to $15/hour over the course of three-to-seven years.


How quickly a business must raise wages depends on its size. Some “Schedule 1″ businesses — those with more than 500 employees in the U.S., or franchisees associated with a company that employs more than 500 people — must raise their lowest level of wages to $11/hour by April 1, 2015. The wages then increase to $13/hour in 2016 and $15/hour in 2017.


If those Schedule 1 businesses contribute to employees’ healthcare benefits, they have longer to raise their wages. In 2016, they would pay $12.50/hour. That increases to $13.50 in 2017, and finally to $15/hour in 2018.


Schedule 2 employers — those with 500 or fewer employees (Does not include franchisees who are part of a large network) — would have several more years to phase in the pay raise. Starting in 2016, the minimum hourly wage increases to $10.50 and increases in $.50 increments each year until 2020, when it reaches $13.50. The next year, 2021, it finally reaches the $15 amount.


The ordinance does allow for the city to eventually create exceptions for trainee and minor employees that would allow employers to pay these workers lower wages. A Council member proposed striking this portion of the law, but the Council voted to keep it.


It’s estimated that around 100,000 members — around 25% — of the Seattle workforce would be affected by the pay raise. Supporters of the bill say that raising the bar on minimum wage will allow them to make ends meet and avoid debt.


“If I was to get this $15… I’d be able to take care of my kids, my family,” an IHOP worker explained at Monday’s packed Council meeting, according to the Seattle Times’ Evan Bush.


Some supporters of the $15 minimum wage claim that the phase-in period as written into the ordinance is too long for workers to wait. They had hoped that there would be an increase starting in January of 2015, instead of the April 2015 start.


A proposal to bring that start date up to Jan. 1 was also voted down by the Council, reportedly resulting in a chorus of boos from activists in the audience.


“I have not met a single person who claims McDonald’s or Starbucks or any other big business needs a phase-in,” chided Council member Kshama Sawant who proposed the defeated amendment.


Later in the hearing, Council member Sally Clark spoke to the activists in the audience who accused the Council of making pro-business compromises to the ordinance.


“Nothing that smells of compromise is acceptable to you,” she explained. “Yet politics is the art of compromise.”


In spite of the heated debate over the amendments, the Council voted unanimously (9-0) to approve the bill.




by Chris Morran via Consumerist

The FCC Comments Site Might Be Broken, But You Can Still E-Mail

nodata As we mentioned this morning, Last Week Tonight host John Oliver made a hilariously profane, impassioned plea for Americans to just give a damn and do something about the FCC’s pending net neutrality (aka “cable company f*ckery”) rules. It seems his call didn’t fall on deaf ears, as the FCC’s commenting system appears to be completely overwhelmed and inaccessible to most people. But that doesn’t mean you can’t still e-mail the Commission.


As we’ve written before, there are several ways to get your opinion on net neutrality, Internet fast lanes, interconnectivity, paid-peering, etc. heard on the record by the FCC.


Since the Commission’s online commenting database appears to be overwhelmed — after all, it’s probably used to getting a handful of comments each day from tech-savvy consumers who understand the incredibly boring inside-baseball language used by regulators and those who are regulated — you’ll have to take advantage of the openinternet@fcc.gov e-mail address that was set up earlier this year in advance of the expected level of interest in FCC Chair Tom Wheeler’s neutrality proposal.


The FCC has previously confirmed to Consumerist that e-mailed comments are indeed added to the docket of comments, so your messages should still matter.


Tell Wheeler and his fellow commissioners that the Internet is not broken. Tell them that the ISPs who do virtually none of the work of carrying data to and from consumers should not have the ability to prioritize content from deep-pocketed companies — and as a result, degrade data from those who don’t or can’t pay.




by Chris Morran via Consumerist

4 principios para lograr equipos motivados #infografia #infographic #rrhh

Hola:


Una infografía con 4 principios para lograr equipos motivados.


Un saludo


4 principios para lograr equipos motivados

4 principios para lograr equipos motivados





Archivado en: Infografía, RRHH Tagged: Infografía, Motivación, RRHH



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La guerra FaceBook vs Google #infografia #infographic #socialmedia

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Una infografía sobre la guerra FaceBook vs Google.


Un saludo


Tech Cold War: Facebook vs. Google - Via Who Is Hosting This: The Blog


Source: WhoIsHostingThis.com




Archivado en: Infografía, Redes Sociales, Sociedad de la información Tagged: FaceBook, Google, Infografía, internet, redes sociales, tic, Web 2.0.



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Twitter de una pequeña empresa #infografia #infographic #socialmedia

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Una infografía sobre Twitter de una pequeña empresa. Vía


Un saludo


Twitter de una pequeña empresa

Twitter de una pequeña empresa





Archivado en: Infografía, Redes Sociales, Sociedad de la información Tagged: Infografía, internet, redes sociales, tic, Twitter, Web 2.0.



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via Alfredo Vela Posteado por www.bscformacion.com

Domino’s And Contest Winner Disagree About How Calendars Work

dominonoThis baseball season, Domino’s Pizza is running a promotion where fans can get a code for a free pizza after the first two no-hitters of the year. While many people were shut out of the code-generating website, reader Jim wasn’t one of them. He got a code. The problem is that he and Domino’s disagree about how calendars work, and now he has no free pizza.


On May 25, Josh Beckett of the Los Angeles Dodgers pitched a no-hitter. That part, everyone agrees on. How the promotion works is that the free pizza website opens up at noon on the first business day after the game. In this case, that was Monday, May 27, since the 25th was a Sunday and the 26th was a holiday. “The first calendar day after May 27 is May 28, the second is May 29, …, the fifth is June 1, so the offer codes should expire at 11:59pm PDT on June 1,” writes Jim. Except his didn’t.


Here’s what the DomiNoNo (that name just reminds me of a certain hair-removal device) page actually says”



PROMOTION TIMING: The Promotion will be made available starting at 12:00 pm (noon) Pacific Daylight Time (“PDT”) on the first (1st) business day following a No-Hitter (“Offer Start Day”) and will end at 11:59 pm PDT on the fifth (5th) calendar day after the Offer Start Day, or while supplies last (each such period, a “Promotion Window”). Promotion codes must be claimed and redeemed during the Promotion Window.



“I tried to redeem my code at 1pm EDT (10am PDT) and it was rejected as ‘invalid for the date of [my] current order’,” Jim wrote to Consumerist. The most likely explanation is that the mysterious “supplies” ran out because it was toward the end of the promotion period, but we checked with Domino’s and will update this post when we hear something back.




by Laura Northrup via Consumerist