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CVS Gives Out Free Cigarette Packs Stuffed With Help For Quitting

You can’t buy tobacco products anymore at the newly-renamed CVS Health, but you can get the cashier to give you a free pack. While the little red box is shaped like a cigarette pack, that isn’t what’s inside. These packs are available for free, and have coupons and materials inside meant to inspire customers to quit smoking.


Reader Randy reorts that cashiers at his local CVS were putting these statements inside customers’ bags.


statement


Behind the counter, cashiers had these free packs, whcih reportedly have at least one generous (CVS-only, of course) coupon for smoking-cessation aids.


lastpack


What caught Randy’s eye was this warning on the outside of the pack:


warning


CVS pharmacies had originally planned to stop selling tobacco products on October 1, but instead emptied the shelves at the beginning of this month. The chain used to make about $2 billion per year from selling tobacco products, but lawmakers nationwide have been making the case that stores shouldn’t sell smokes alongside medicine.


PREVIOUSLY:

CVS Yanks Tobacco Products From Its Shelves A Month Earlier Than Planned




by Laura Northrup via Consumerist

Top 20 blogs sobre marketing y publicidad más influyentes (9/2014) #infografia #infographic #marketing

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Una infografía con el Top 20 blogs sobre marketing y publicidad más influyentes (9/2014). Creado por eBuzzing.


Un saludo


Top 20 blogs sobre marketing y publicidad más influyentes (9/2014)

Top 20 blogs sobre marketing y publicidad más influyentes (9/2014)





Archivado en: Infografía, Marketing on line, Sociedad de la información Tagged: Blogs, Infografía, internet, Marketing, tic, Web 2.0.



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EA CEO: We Don’t Want To Win Worst Company Award For 3rd Time

eapoowinner In 2013, video game giant Electronic Arts became the first business to be named Worst Company In America twice by Consumerist readers (a feat that has since been matched by Comcast). EA made the brackets again this year, but narrowly lost out to Time Warner Cable in the early rounds. And if relatively new EA CEO Andrew Wilson had his way, his company would never be up for WCIA consideration again.


“We didn’t even make it out of the first round this year,” Wilson tells The Guardian, apparently taking his company’s two wins with a sense of humor missing from his predecessor. “When I came into this job, the board didn’t want the company to be perceived that way.”


He claims the company is learning from its mistakes, like the decision to unleash a broken Battlefield 4 on the market earlier than it should have been, resulting in glitches galore and people unable to play the game they’d spend at least $60 on.


Wilson points to what he maintains was a successful beta test of the upcoming Battlefield Hardline title as evidence that EA is living up to its supposed “player-first” philosophy.


“We learned about scalability and stability [from Battlefield 4] and that allowed us to let gamers in earlier and give us feedback,” explains Wilson. “What we got from the community was, ‘this is cool, but we think the fiction should go deeper’. We were then able to make a judgment call on that. I don’t think it would have been possible before.”


EA has a couple opportunities in the near future to prove that its business plan isn’t to release half-baked, cookie-cutter titles that are merely cash-ins of well-established series. Next week sees the release of Madden NFL 15, which has already resulted in one of the more hilarious glitches we’ve seen in a while:



Then later in the fall EA will release the third title in its popular Dragon Age series. It’s both the first DA title for the latest generation of gaming consoles and it follows the tepidly received Dragon Age 2, a game that annoyed many fans of the first with its repetitive settings and other corner-cutting that resulted from EA’s rush to release the game on time.


“I hope we never appear on that list again, I truly do,” says Wilson. “But I expect that, as we push the boundaries of entertainment, we will get feedback from time to time that people want us to do different things. That’s okay. That’s the cool thing about our industry.”




by Chris Morran via Consumerist

10 citas célebres sobre la ignorancia #infografia #infographic #citas #quotes

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Una infografía con 10 citas célebres sobre la ignorancia. Realizada con Piktochart.


Un saludo


10 citas célebres sobre la ignorancia

10 citas célebres sobre la ignorancia





Archivado en: Frases y citas, Infografía Tagged: Citas, Infografía



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8 beneficios de los post de autores invitados en tu blog #infografia #infographic #socialmedia

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Una infografía con 8 beneficios de los post de autores invitados en tu blog. Vía


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8 beneficios de los post de autores invitados en tu blog

8 beneficios de los post de autores invitados en tu blog





Archivado en: Infografía, Sociedad de la información Tagged: Blogs, Infografía, internet, tic



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Cheese Makers In Switzerland Fight Counterfeits With Secret Bacteria

(Rusty Clark)

(Rusty Clark)



Did you know that counterfeit Swiss cheese is a problem? It certainly is if you’re a cheesemaker in Switzerland. Industry experts recently estimated that as much as 10% of all Emmental cheese (that’s the pale yellow cheese with holes in it that Americans usually refer to as “Swiss” cheese) sold outside of Switzerland was fake: not made in Switzerland. How are the Swiss protecting their cheese industry, which has exports in the hundreds of millions of dollars? DNA tests.

Cheese DNA tests? Yes, cheese-makers in Switzerland are adding secret microbes to their products to prevent fakes. Bloomberg Businessweek reports that it took ten years for government scientists to find bacterial markers that would be detectable in the cheese after aging, but not change the texture or flavor in any way.


What it allows the government to do is perform spot checks on even the smallest slices of cheese found in grocery stores abroad. Yes, miscreants who make fake Emmental and gruyère are an actual problem. If the bacterial marker isn’t there, the cheese didn’t come from an approved producer that meets the stringent rules that cheesemakers must follow in order to use the traditional names.


How to Make Sure That’s Really Swiss Cheese [Bloomberg Businessweek]




by Laura Northrup via Consumerist

Comcast: Approve TWC Merger Because Broadband Will Still Suck Just As Much


Yesterday, FCC Chair Tom Wheeler surprised a lot of people by publicly discussing the woeful state of broadband competition in the U.S. Some viewed his remarks as an indicator that the commission is leaning toward blocking the pending Comcast/Time Warner Cable merger, but the ever-optimistic (read: delusional) Comcast argue that Wheeler’s words actually support the deal.

“The facts are simple,” writes Comcast’s merger whisperer, Exec. VP David Cohen. “Our transaction will have no negative impact on the competitiveness of the broadband consumer market… Every consumer in America will have the same choices among broadband providers after this transaction as before.”


As we’ve said repeatedly, this lack of competition — and the fact that it’s only going to remain the same — is precisely the problem with this merger.


We should not reward a fundamentally flawed industry that has allowed Comcast to grow, not by being the best at what it does, but by purchasing smaller companies and acquiring their exclusive contracts with local governments.


Comcast brags about spending billions to improve its network. Why doesn’t it take the many billions of dollars it plans to spend on this merger and offer a service that brings competition to consumers?


Google is trying. AT&T is trying (though they don’t want anyone else to). Even ViaSat’s Exede is starting to offer a satellite broadband plan that is semi-competitive to terrestrial service.


But Comcast doesn’t want to take the risk of having to win over consumers when it could just force them to become Comcast customers by acquiring Time Warner Cable.


And what about the options for the millions of customers who are being passed around like hot potatoes in this deal?


1.6 million current Charter customers will become Comcast subscribers, while 1.4 million Time Warner Cable customers get turned over to Charter without any say-so in the matter.


Then there are the 2.5 million Comcast customers being dumped off into a completely new company, GreatLand, that is 33% owned by Charter.


That’s 5.5 million Americans, most of whom had no choice in cable provider, that will be handed over to a new company within months just because Comcast doesn’t want to compete for customers in California, New England, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, Texas, Oregon, Washington, and Virginia


This sort of passing around of customers happened for a long time in the wireless market, as regional players consolidated and swapped. The difference there is that most Americans still have multiple options for wireless service, so if you were a Cingular customer unhappy about becoming an AT&T subscriber, you could jump ship to T-Mobile, Sprint, Verizon, or numerous regional and prepaid carriers.


Even with four major national wireless providers, the FCC and Justice Dept. successfully blocked AT&T’s acquisition of T-Mobile because it would have left consumers with only three options for wireless service.


Meanwhile, as Chairman Wheeler’s presentation demonstrated, fewer than 10% of Americans have access to even three options for decent broadband service.


In reiterating his stance, Cohen makes perhaps his most inane statement yet on competition:



“[W]hether you are satisfied with the robust state of broadband competition today or deeply troubled by an absence of broadband competition, our transaction will simply not have a negative impact on the current competitive state of the broadband market in America today.”



This is like someone serving up bowl of hot rocks for dinner and saying, “Whether you’re satisfied with this warm filling bowl of mineral-rich goodness or deeply troubled by the fact that I’m telling you to eat a bowl of hot rocks, it doesn’t change the fact that this is all there is to eat.”




by Chris Morran via Consumerist

Consejos para viajeros con diabetes #infografia #infographic #health #tourism

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Una infografía sobre Consejos para viajeros con diabetes. Vía


Un saludo


Consejos para viajeros don diabetes

Consejos para viajeros don diabetes





Archivado en: Infografía, Salud Tagged: Infografía, Salud, Turismo



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Manual oficial de Google Adwords #marketing

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Os dejamos con el Manual oficial de Google Adwords.


Un saludo




Archivado en: Marketing on line, Sociedad de la información Tagged: Google, internet, Marketing, tic



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